WATER QUALITY & ENVIRONMENT

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LAUREL LAKE WATER QUALITY RATES AMONG THE BEST IN NH.

The Aquatic Invasive Species Survey, Volunteer Lake Assessment, and Lake Host programs are key elements of Laurel Lake Association efforts to continually monitor lake health and update its members on findings, trends, and concerns.

AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES SURVEY -

MONITORING WEEDS

The Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Survey group, affectionately called the Weed Watchers, surveys the lake three times a year cataloging types and quantities of plants growing in the lake.  We are very fortunate that no invasive species such as variable milfoil have been found in our lake. The benefit of an invasive species-free lake cannot be overstated. 

 

The AIS Survey committee has divided Laurel Lake into sectors, and AIS teams are assigned to survey and record their findings from these lake locations. AIS Survey reports are compiled by program coordinator Beth Samuels who, in turn, posts those results annually. 

 

VOLUNTEER LAKE ASSESSMENT PROGRAM -

MONITORING WATER QUALITY

The Association is part of the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (DES) Volunteer Lake Assessment program. This program monitors the water quality of our lake.  Water samples are taken during June, July, and August. The samples are analyzed at the DES lab and a report is issued each year.  More NH lakes water quality information is available here.

We are always looking for help.  For more information or to volunteer contact program coordinator Barbara Green.

LAKE HOST PROGRAM -

KEEPING INVASIVE SPECIES OUT

The Lake Host Program is a courtesy boat inspection program administered by NH LAKES and supported by the Laurel Lake Association to prevent the introduction and spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS), plants and animals from regional bodies of water.  Laurel Lake’s water quality is rated as among the best in NH and we are very fortunate to have kept variable milfoil and other invasives like Asian clams from Laurel Lake. 

The Lake Host Program is our first line of defense in keeping aquatic invasive species from Laurel Lake.  Thank you for your participation.

 

Invasive species are undesirable because: they make recreation in and on the water dangerous and unpleasant; they disrupt the ecological balance and change the character of the lake; and they are extremely difficult and expensive to control. 

All Laurel Lake boating guests are asked to arrive at the boat ramp with your boat

“cleaned, drained, and dry”.  The chart to the right provides a quick guide for doing that.

 

Laurel Lake Hosts are trained staff and volunteers who are there to help protect our lake. 

When guest boaters arrive at the boat ramp, please help the Lake Hosts:

  - Provide quick information about aquatic invasive species.

  - Conduct a brief boater survey.
  - Promote “Clean, Drain & Dry” for preventing the spread of aquatic invasive species.
  - Conduct courtesy boat & trailer inspections to remove all hitchhiking aquatic invasive species

 

A listing of all NH lakes with variable milfoil and/or other invasive species is available  here.

Many thanks to our 2021 Lake Host Volunteers Phil Strahan, Denis Guenette, Tom White, Nan Fey-Yensan, and Ken DeBlieu, and our paid Lake Host Inspector Bob Handy.  Our 2021 Lake Host team logged 230 ramp inspections and 1 invasive "save" this summer.  If you're interested in keeping Laurel Lake free from invasives while greeting guests to our lake, check-out the links below or contact Chip Yensan at chipyensan@gmail.com

 

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LAKE WILDLIFE & THE ENVIRONMENT

We all benefit from Laurel Lake's wonderful environment and wildlife.  It follows, then, that maintaining our water quality and a healthy lake ecosystem is the joint responsibility of both its residents and guests.  State and local regulations, guidelines, and programs like the NH Shoreland Protection Act, NH Lake Smart, and the NH Homeowner's Stormwater Guide provide reasonable and responsible pathways to a healthy lake environment.

 

Our lake is home to loons, hawks, osprey, cormorants, owls, herons, and bald eagles, and myriad other birds and water foul.  The lake supports trout, bass, perch, and other pan fish. Lake otters have been seen swimming across the lake - even sliding on and off a fresh layer of ice.  The elusive bobcat is occasionally spotted, especially in the winter.  And just as critters and animals such as deer, beavers, raccoons, and even the occasional bear can be a nuisance to us, we can create challenges for our lake wildlife as well.   A healthy and respectful co-existence strengthens our lake ecosystem.